5 causes of nappy rash

Nappy rash is one of the most common conditions in newborns. Studies show that it is an easily treatable skin irritation that occurs in many babies. Nappy rash causes a red, inflamed rash that can be either dry or moist, and may be shiny or pimply, depending on your baby’s skin. Here are the common causes.

5 causes of nappy rash

Moisture
No matter what the disposable nappy adverts tell you, there will always be at least a little moisture in contact with the skin. Any prolonged contact can cause nappy rash, particularly if there has been a bowel movement. This can also extend to bathtime though: drying the delicate area thoroughly after a bath and before putting a nappy on can help decrease the risk of your baby developing nappy rash.
 
Chemicals
Any one of the many chemicals used to make disposable nappies could cause an outbreak of nappy rash, particularly if your baby has extra-sensitive skin. Changing to cloth nappies may not be the answer either, as detergents used to wash them may have the same effect. It’s a good idea to try a few different brands of nappies, particularly eco-friendly nappies (chlorine free and with no extra chemicals) to see which ones alleviate the problem. Using very mild products on your baby at bathtime, and using a tepid face cloth instead of baby wipes at nappy changes can help to eliminate the chances of nappy rash.
 
Chafing
Is your baby’s nappy possibly a little too tight? Being afraid of leakage is understandable, but giving your baby’s bottom a little air between it and the nappy may help to decrease the constant rubbing of material on soft skin. Patting your baby dry instead of rubbing will help decrease the risk of any further chafing.
 
Allergies
Introducing your baby to solid foods changes the composition of the stool. This could cause or exacerbate a nappy rash problem when it comes into contact with the skin. Introducing your baby to one new food at a time may help you determine which foods could be a problem.
 
Medication
Any medication that your baby takes can affect the chemical content of their stool and urine, causing nappy rash. If your baby is taking antibiotics for example, it’s a good idea to change their nappy a little more frequently and use a barrier cream instead of powder at every nappy change. This could diminish the chance of nappy rash developing. 
 
Prevention

  • Dry your baby’s bottom thoroughly after a bath and before putting a nappy on.
  • Use very mild products on your baby at bathtime, and use a tepid face cloth instead of baby wipes at nappy changes if they are sensitive to the chemicals in baby wipes.
  • Give your baby’s bottom a little air between it and the nappy may help to decrease chafing.
  • Introduce your baby to one new food at a time to highlight any potential allergies.
  • f your baby is taking antibiotics, change their nappy a little more frequently and use a barrier cream instead of powder at every nappy change. 
Nappy rash is extremely common, and usually clears up after just a few days. Using a barrier cream at every nappy change will further protect your baby’s delicate skin. Do you have a tried and tested cure for nappy rash?

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